Improving your posture

When standing – hold your head high, chin firmly forward, shoulders back, chest out, and stomach tucked in to increase your balance. If you stand all day in a job like a cashier or clerk, rest one foot on a stool or take breaks to get off your feet for a while. Read more…

When sitting – use a chair with firm low back support. Keep desk or table top elbow high, adjust the chair or use a footrest to keep pressure off the back of the legs, and keep your knees a little higher than your hips. Get up and stretch frequently–every hour if you sit for long periods of time. Read more…

When working on a computer – take a one or two minute task break every 20 minutes when you work at a computer screen. Keep the screen 15 degrees below eye level. Place reference materials on a copy stand even with and close to the terminal. Read more…

When sitting in the car – adjust the seat forward so your knees are higher than your hips. Put a small pillow or cushion in the small of your back. Read more…

When sleeping – sleep on your side with your knees bent and head supported by a pillow, to make your head level with your spine. Or, sleep on your back, avoiding thick pillows under your head. Use a small pillow under your neck instead. Don’t sleep on your stomach. Read more…

When lifting – let your legs do the work in order to prevent injury to your low back. Stand close to the object, then where possible squat down and straddle it. Grasp the object, and slowly lift the load by straightening your legs as you stand up. Carry the object close to your body. Read more…

When bending – never twist from the waist and bend forward at the same time. To lift or reach something on the floor, bend the knees while keeping the back straight. Read more…

Posture is the position in which you hold your body upright against force of gravity while standing or sitting. The posture constantly changes depending on the activity, however no matter what you are doing, there is a way of holding and moving your body that is balanced and efficient. Read more…

Your posture is second nature to you, a taken-for-granted habit. This means that you have control of it. Often, poor posture develops because of accidents or falls. However, poor posture usually develops from bad habits. Read more…